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          Institute: MPI für Neurobiologie     Collection: Cellular and Systems Neurobiology     Display Documents



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ID: 10462.0, MPI für Neurobiologie / Cellular and Systems Neurobiology
Spine motility: Phenomenology, mechanisms, and function
Authors:Bonhoeffer, T.; Yuste, R.
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2002-09-12
Title of Journal:Neuron
Journal Abbrev.:Neuron
Volume:35
Issue / Number:6
Start Page:1019
End Page:1027
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:Throughout the history of neuroscience, dendritic spines have been considered stable structures, but in recent years, imaging techniques have revealed that spines are constantly changing shape. Spine motility is difficult to categorize, has different forms, and possibly even represents multiple phenomena. It is influenced by synaptic transmission, intracellular calcium, and a multitude of ions and other molecules. An actin-based cascade mediates this phenomenon, and while the precise signaling pathways are still unclear, the Rho family of GTPases could well be a "common denominator" controlling spine morphology. One role of spine motility might be to enable a searching function during synaptogenesis, allowing for more efficacious neuronal connectivity in the neuronal thicket. This idea revisits concepts originally formulated by Cajal, who proposed over a hundred years ago that spines might help to increase and modify synaptic connections.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Affiliations:MPI für Neurobiologie/Cellular and Systems Neurobiology (Bonhoeffer)
External Affiliations:Max Planck Inst Neurobiol, Munich, Germany; Max Planck Inst Neurobiol, Munich, Germany; Columbia Univ, Dept Biol Sci, New York, NY 10027 USA
Identifiers:ISI:000178040000004
ISSN:0896-6273
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