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          Institute: MPI für extraterrestrische Physik     Collection: Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy     Display Documents



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ID: 12120.0, MPI für extraterrestrische Physik / Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy
The origin of water vapor and carbon dioxide in Jupiter's stratosphere
Authors:Lellouch, E.; Bezard, B.; Moses, J. I.; Davis, G. R.; Drossart, P.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Bergin, E. A.; Moreno, R.; Encrenaz, T.
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2002-09
Title of Journal:Icarus
Volume:159
Issue / Number:1
Start Page:112
End Page:131
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Experts Only
Abstract / Description:Observations of H2O rotational lines from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) and of the CO2 nu(2) band by ISO are analyzed jointly to determine the origin of water vapor and carbon dioxide in Jupiter's stratosphere. Simultaneous modelling of ISO/LWS and ISO/SWS observations acquired in 1997 indicates that most of the stratospheric jovian water is restricted to pressures less than 0.5 +/- 12 mbar, with a disk-averaged column density of (2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(15) cm(-2). Disk-resolved observations of CO2 by ISO/SWS reveal latitudinal variations of the CO2 abundance, with a decrease of at least a factor of 7 from mid-southern to mid-northern latitudes, and a disk-center column density of (3.4 +/- 0.7) x 10(14) cm(-2). These results strongly suggest that the observed. H2O and CO2 primarily result from the production, at midsouthern latitudes, of oxygenated :material in the form of CO and H2O by the Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9) impacts in July 1994 and subsequent chemical and transport evolution, rather than from a permanent interplanetary dust particle or satellite source. This conclusion is supported by quantitative evolution model calculations. Given the characteristic vertical mixing times in Jupiter's stratosphere, material deposited at similar to0.1 mbar by the SL9 impacts is indeed expected to diffuse down to the similar to0.5 mbar level after 3 years. A coupled chemical- horizontal transport model indicates that the stability of water vapor against photolysis and conversion to CO2 is maintained over typically similar to50 years by the decrease of the local CO mixing ratio associated with horizontal spreading. A model with an initial (i.e., SL9-produced) H2O/CO mass mixing ratio of 0.07, not inconsistent with immediate postimpact observations, matches the observed H2O abundance and CO2 horizontal distribution 3 years after the impacts. In contrast, the production Of CO2 from SL9-produced CO and a water component deriving from an interplanetary dust component is insufficient to account for the observed CO2 amounts. The observations can further be used to place a stringent upper limit (8 x 10(4) cm(-2) s(-1)) on the permanent water influx into Jupiter. This may indicate that the much larger flux observed at Saturn derives dominantly from a ring source, or that the ablation of micrometeoroids leads dominantly to different species at Saturn (H2O) and Jupiter (CO). Finally, the SWAS H2O spectra do not appear fully consistent with the ISO data and should be confirmed by future ODIN and Herschel observations. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
Free Keywords:Jupiter's atmosphere; spectroscopy
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:N. N.
Affiliations:MPI für extraterrestrische Physik
External Affiliations:Observ Paris, F-92195 Meudon, France; Observ Paris, F-92195 Meudon, France; Lunar & Planetary Inst, Houston, TX 77058 USA; Univ Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2, Canada; Max Planck Inst Extraterr Phys, D-85740 Garching, Germany; Harvard Smithsonian Ctr Astrophys, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA; Inst Radio Astron Millimetr, F-38400 St Martin Dheres, France
Identifiers:ISI:000177992100008
ISSN:0019-1035
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