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          Institute: MPI für Evolutionsbiologie     Collection: Tropical ecology     Display Documents



  history
ID: 175516.0, MPI für Evolutionsbiologie / Tropical ecology
Circulatory responses to submersion in larvae of
Phaeoxantha klugii (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae) from Central
Amazonian floodplains
Authors:Zerm, Matthias; Adis, Joachim; Krumme, Uwe
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2004
Title of Journal:Studies on Neotropical Fauna and Environment
Volume:39
Issue / Number:1
Start Page:91
End Page:94
Review Status:not specified
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:The univoltine tiger beetle Phaeoxantha klugii survives an
annual inundation period of up to 3.5 months in the third
larval stage submerged in the soil. We visually determined
the circulatory response to submersion of third-stage larvae
in the laboratory. Heart rate depression upon submersion was
about 50–67% during the first hours and reached values near
zero in most larvae submerged for 2.8–6 days. Apart from a
rapid first increase upon removal from the water the heart
rate varied greatly within and between individuals. Longer
submersion lead to stronger circulatory depression and
delayed recovery (time until resuming of digging activity).
The heart rate of larvae resuming digging activity was only
66% of the initial rate before submersion. Unlike the duration of recovery the heart rate relative to the initial values before submersion was not correlated with the duration of preceding submersion. The degree of circulatory depression
during the first hours of submersion is less drastic than the
metabolic depression of 75–95% measured as oxygen uptake
in submerged larvae reported in a previous study. Visual
determination of heart rate might be an useful tool to study
physiological aspects of submersion and hypoxia resistance
also in other insects.
Free Keywords:tiger beetle; Amazon; floodplain; circulatory depression; inundation
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:Pia Parolin
Affiliations:MPI für Limnologie/AG Tropenökologie
External Affiliations:Center for Tropical Marine Ecology, Bremen, Germany
Identifiers:ISSN:0165-0521 [ID-No:1]
DOI:10.1080/01650520412331271025 [ID-No:2]
LOCALID:2296/S 38171 [Listen-Nummer/S-Nummer]
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