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          Institute: MPI für Astronomie     Collection: Publikationen_mpia     Display Documents



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ID: 198438.0, MPI für Astronomie / Publikationen_mpia
A gravitationally lensed quasar with quadruple
images separated by 14.62arcseconds
Authors:Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Pindor, Bartosz; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Chiu, Kuenley; Zheng, Wei; Ichikawa, Shin-Ichi; Gregg, Michael D.; Becker, Robert H.; Suto, Yasushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Turner, Edwin L.; Keeton, Charles R.; Annis, James; Castander, Francisco J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gunn, James E.; Johnston, David E.; Kent, Stephen M.; Nichol, Robert C.; Richards, Gordon T.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sheldon, Erin Scott; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Ivezic, Z.; Lamb, Don Q.; McKay, Timothy A.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2003
Title of Journal:Nature
Journal Abbrev.:Nature
Volume:426
Start Page:810
End Page:812
Review Status:not specified
Audience:Experts Only
Abstract / Description:Gravitational lensing is a powerful tool for
the study of the distribution of dark matter in
the Universe. The cold-dark-matter model of the
formation of large-scale structures (that is,
clusters of galaxies and even larger assemblies)
predicts the existence of quasars
gravitationally lensed by concentrations of dark
matter so massive that the quasar images would
be split by over 7arcsec. Numerous searches for
large-separation lensed quasars have, however,
been unsuccessful. All of the roughly 70 lensed
quasars known, including the first lensed quasar
discovered, have smaller separations that can be
explained in terms of galaxy-scale
concentrations of baryonic matter. Although
gravitationally lensed galaxies with large
separations are known, quasars are more useful
cosmological probes because of the simplicity of
the resulting lens systems. Here we report the
discovery of a lensed quasar, SDSS J1004 + 4112,
which has a maximum separation between the
components of 14.62arcsec. Such a large
separation means that the lensing object must be
dominated by dark matter. Our results are fully
consistent with theoretical expectations based
on the cold-dark-matter model.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:N. N.
Affiliations:MPI für Astronomie
External Affiliations:The University of Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan),
AC(Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall,
Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA), AD(Princeton
University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton,
New Jersey 08544, USA), AE(Department of Physics
and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San
Martin Drive, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA),
AF(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns
Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive,
Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA), AG(National
Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka,
Tokyo 181-8588, Japan), AH(Department of Physics,
University of California at Davis, 1 Shields
Avenue, Davis, California 95616, USA),
AI(Department of Physics, University of
California at Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis,
California 95616, USA), AJ(Department of Physics,
School of Science, The University of Tokyo,
113-0033, Japan), AK(Princeton University
Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, New Jersey
08544, USA), AL(Princeton University Observatory,
Peyton Hall, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA),
AM(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics,
University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue,
Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA), AN(Fermi National
Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 500, Batavia,
Illinois 60510, USA), AO(Institut d'Estudis
Espacials de Catalunya/CSIC, Gran Capita 2-4,
08034 Barcelona, Spain), AP(Steward Observatory,
University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue,
Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA), AQ(Department of
Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of
Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois 60637, USA), AR(Institute for Cosmic Ray
Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa,
Chiba 277-8582, Japan), AS(Princeton University
Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, New Jersey
08544, USA), AT(Department of Astronomy and
Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South
Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA),
AU(Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box
500, Batavia, Illinois 60510, USA), AV(Department
of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA),
AW(Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall,
Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA), AX(Max-Planck
Institute for Astronomy, K ouml;nigstuhl 17,
D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany), AY(Department of
Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of
Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois 60637, USA), AZ(Princeton University
Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, New Jersey
08544, USA), BA(Apache Point Observatory, PO Box
59, Sunspot, New Mexico 88349, USA), BB(Princeton
University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton,
New Jersey 08544, USA), BC(Department of
Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of
Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois 60637, USA), BD(Department of Physics,
University of Michigan, 500 East University
Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA),
BE(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics,
Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey
Laboratory, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802,
USA), BF(Department of Astronomy and
Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South
Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA)
Identifiers:URL:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?bi... [ID No:1]
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