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          Institute: MPI für Meteorologie     Collection: Atmosphere in the Earth System     Display Documents



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ID: 224126.0, MPI für Meteorologie / Atmosphere in the Earth System
Global Wildland Fire Emission Model (GWEM): Evaluating the use of global area burnt satellite data
Authors:Hoelzemann, Judith J.; Schultz, Martin G.; Brasseur, Guy P.; Granier, Claire; Simon, M.
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2004-06-05
Title of Journal:Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres
Journal Abbrev.:J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos.
Volume:109
Issue / Number:D14
Sequence Number of Article:D14S04
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:The new Global Wildland Fire Emission Model (GWEM) has been developed on the basis of data from the European Space Agency's monthly Global Burnt Scar satellite product (GLOBSCAR) and results from the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ-DGVM). GWEM computes monthly emissions of more than 40 chemical compounds and aerosols from forest and savanna fires. This study focuses on an evaluation of the GLOBSCAR data set. The GWEM version presented here makes use of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover map. Emission totals for the year 2000 are 1741 Tg C, 5716 Tg CO2, 271 Tg CO, 12.52 Tg CH4, 9.09 Tg C (as nonmethane hydrocarbons), 8.08 Tg NOx (as NO), 24.30 Tg PM2.5, 15.80 Tg OC, and 1.84 Tg black carbon. These emissions are lower than other estimates found in literature. An evaluation assesses the uncertainties of the individual input data. The GLOBSCAR product yields reasonable estimates of burnt area for large wildland fires in most parts of the globe but experiences problems in some regions where small fires dominate. The seasonality derived from GLOBSCAR differs from other satellite products detecting active fires owing to the different algorithms applied. Application of the presented GWEM results in global chemistry transport modeling will require additional treatment of small deforestation fires in the tropical rain forest regions and small savanna fires, mainly in subequatorial Africa. Further improvements are expected from a more detailed description of the carbon pools and the inclusion of anthropogenic disturbances in the LPJ model.
Free Keywords:vegetation fire emissions; global area burnt satellite products; tropospheric chemistry; KRUGER-NATIONAL-PARK; VEGETATION FIRE; NUTRIENT POOLS; INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY; ATMOSPHERIC EMISSIONS; TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION; SAVANNA ECOSYSTEMS; INITIATIVE SAFARI; BRAZILIAN AMAZON; CARBON EMISSIONS
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:Carola Kauhs
Affiliations:MPI für Meteorologie/Atmosphere in the Earth System
MPI für Meteorologie/IMPRS Earth System Modelling
External Affiliations:European Space Agcy, ESRIN, I-00044 Frascati, Italy.; Univ Paris 06, Serv Aeron, Paris, France.; NOAA, Aeron Lab, Cooperat Inst Res Environm Sci, Boulder, CO 80303 USA.
Identifiers:ISI:000221953900001
ISSN:0148-0227
DOI:10.1029/2003JD003666
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