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          Institute: MPI für Meteorologie     Collection: Ocean in the Earth System     Display Documents



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ID: 224144.0, MPI für Meteorologie / Ocean in the Earth System
Evaluating global ocean carbon models: The importance of realistic physics
Authors:Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, K.; Caldeira, K.; Campin, J. M.; Drange, H.; Dutay, J. C.; Follows, M.; Gao, Y.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gruber, N.; Ishida, A.; Joos, F.; Madec, G.; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Marshall, J. C.; Matear, R. J.; Monfray, P.; Mouchet, A.; Najjar, R.; Orr, J. C.; Plattner, G. K.; Sarmiento, J.; Schlitzer, R.; Slater, R.; Totterdell, I. J.; Weirig, M. F.; Yamanaka, Y.; Yool, A.
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2004-09-15
Title of Journal:Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Journal Abbrev.:Glob. Biogeochem. Cycle
Volume:18
Issue / Number:3
Sequence Number of Article:GB3017
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:A suite of standard ocean hydrographic and circulation metrics are applied to the equilibrium physical solutions from 13 global carbon models participating in phase 2 of the Ocean Carbon-cycle Model Intercomparison Project (OCMIP-2). Model-data comparisons are presented for sea surface temperature and salinity, seasonal mixed layer depth, meridional heat and freshwater transport, 3-D hydrographic fields, and meridional overturning. Considerable variation exists among the OCMIP-2 simulations, with some of the solutions falling noticeably outside available observational constraints. For some cases, model-model and model-data differences can be related to variations in surface forcing, subgrid-scale parameterizations, and model architecture. These errors in the physical metrics point to significant problems in the underlying model representations of ocean transport and dynamics, problems that directly affect the OCMIP predicted ocean tracer and carbon cycle variables (e.g., air-sea CO2 flux, chlorofluorocarbon and anthropogenic CO2 uptake, and export production). A substantial fraction of the large model-model ranges in OCMIP-2 biogeochemical fields (+/-25-40%) represents the propagation of known errors in model physics. Therefore the model-model spread likely overstates the uncertainty in our current understanding of the ocean carbon system, particularly for transport-dominated fields such as the historical uptake of anthropogenic CO2. A full error assessment, however, would need to account for additional sources of uncertainty such as more complex biological-chemical-physical interactions, biases arising from poorly resolved or neglected physical processes, and climate change
Free Keywords:global carbon models; ocean carbon systems; OCMIP-2; GENERAL-CIRCULATION MODEL; PARTICULATE ORGANIC-MATTER; ANTARCTIC BOTTOM WATER; NORTH-ATLANTIC; TRACER TRANSPORTS; ATMOSPHERIC CO2; HEAT-TRANSPORT; WORLD OCEAN; FLUXES; DRIVEN
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Version Comment:Automatic journal name synchronization
Communicated by:Carola Kauhs
Affiliations:MPI für Meteorologie/The Ocean in the Earth System/Ocean Biogeochemistry
External Affiliations:Woods Hole Oceanog Inst, Dept Marine Chem & Geochem, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA.; Natl Ctr Atmospher Res, Climate & Global Dynam Div, Boulder, CO 80307 USA.; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab, Climate Syst Modeling Grp, Livermore, CA 94550 USA.; Univ Liege, Liege, Belgium.; Nansen Environm & Remote Sensing Ctr, Bergen, Norway.; CEA Saclay, Lab Sci Climat & Environm, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.; MIT, Dept Earth Atmospher & Planetary Sci, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA.; Princeton Univ, Atmospher & Ocean Sci Program, Princeton, NJ 08542 USA.; Univ Calif Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.; Inst Global Change Res, Kanazawa Ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 2360001, Japan.; Univ Bern, Inst Phys, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland.; Univ Paris 06, Lab Oceanog Dynam & Climatol, F-75252 Paris, France.; CSIRO, Div Marine Res, Hobart, Tas 7001, Australia.; UPS, IRD, CNRS, CNES,Lab Etud Geophys & Ocanog Spatiales, F-31401 Toulouse, France.; Penn State Univ, Dept Meteorol, State Coll, PA 16802 USA.; Alfred Wegener Inst Polar & Marine Res, D-27515 Bremerhaven, Germany.; Univ Southampton, George Deacon Div, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.; Univ Southampton, Southampton Oceanog Ctr, Dept Oceanog, Southampton SO14 3ZH, Hants, England.
Identifiers:ISI:000224123200001
ISSN:0886-6236
DOI:10.1029/2003GB002150,
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