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          Institute: MPI für Meteorologie     Collection: Atmosphere in the Earth System     Display Documents



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ID: 224177.0, MPI für Meteorologie / Atmosphere in the Earth System
Simulating the global atmospheric black carbon cycle: a revisit to the contribution of aircraft emissions
Authors:Hendricks, J.; Karcher, B.; Dopelheuer, A.; Feichter, Johann; Lohmann, Ulrike; Baumgardner, D.
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2004-12-10
Title of Journal:Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Journal Abbrev.:Atmos. Chem. Phys.
Volume:4
Start Page:2521
End Page:2541
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:The black carbon ( BC) burden of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UTLS) is investigated with the general circulation model (GCM) ECHAM4. The special focus is the contribution of aircraft emissions to the UTLS BC loading. Previous studies on the role of aircraft emissions in the global BC cycle either neglect BC sources located at the Earth's surface or simplify the BC cycle by assuming pre-defined BC residence times. Here, the global BC cycle including emissions, transport, and removal is explicitly simulated. The BC emissions considered include surface sources as well as BC from aviation. This enables a consistent calculation of the relative contribution of aviation to the global atmospheric BC cycle. As a further extension to the previous studies, the aviation-induced perturbation of the UTLS BC particle number concentration is investigated. The uncertainties associated with the model predictions are evaluated by means of several sensitivity studies. Especially, the sensitivity of the results to different assumptions on the BC hygroscopic properties is analysed. The simulated UTLS BC concentrations are compared to in-situ observations. The simulations suggest that the large-scale contribution of aviation to the UTLS BC mass budget typically amounts to only a few percent, even in the most frequented flight regions. The aviation impact far away from these regions is negligible. The simulated aircraft contributions to the UTLS BC particle number concentration are much larger compared to the corresponding mass perturbations. The simulations suggest that aviation can cause large-scale increases in the UTLS BC particle number concentration of more than 30% in regions highly frequented by aircraft. The relative effect shows a pronounced annual variation with the largest relative aviation impact occurring during winter
Free Keywords:AVIATION-PRODUCED AEROSOLS; GENERAL-CIRCULATION MODEL; CIRRUS CLOUD FORMATION; IN-SITU MEASUREMENTS; SULFATE AEROSOLS; LOWER STRATOSPHERE; UPPER TROPOSPHERE; SOOT PARTICLES; MASS CLOSURE; TRANSPORT
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:Carola Kauhs
Affiliations:MPI für Meteorologie/Atmosphere in the Earth System
External Affiliations:DLR, Inst Phys Atmosphare, Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany.; DLR, Inst Antriebstech, Cologne, Germany.; Dalhousie Univ, Halifax, NS, Canada.; Univ Nacl Autonoma Mexico, Ctr Ciencias Atmosfera, Mexico City 04510, DF, Mexico.
Identifiers:ISI:000225707000002 [ID No:1]
ISSN:1680-7324 [ID No:2]
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