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          Institute: Fritz-Haber-Institut     Collection: Physical Chemistry     Display Documents



ID: 225626.0, Fritz-Haber-Institut / Physical Chemistry
Electrochemical probes for metal/electrolyte system characterization during crevice corrosion
Authors:Wolfe, Ryan C.; Weil, Konrad G.; Pickering, Howard W.
Language:English
Publisher:China Science and Technology Press
Place of Publication:Beijing
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2004-08
Title of Proceedings:Environment Sensitive Cracking and Corrosion Damage
Start Page:87
End Page:98
Physical Description:Proceedings book
Name of Conference/Meeting:Third International Conference on Environment Sensitive Cracking and Corrosion Damage (3rd ESCCD)
Place of Conference/Meeting:Qingdao, China
(Start) Date of Conference/Meeting
 (YYYY-MM-DD):
2004-08-09
End Date of Conference/Meeting 
 (YYYY-MM-DD):
2004-08-12
Copyright:© China Science and Technology Press
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Experts Only
Abstract / Description:Electrochemical microprobes for monitoring of the electrochemical conditions inside recesses are needed to better understand how localized corrosion and other charge transfer processes occur in confined spaces. The electrode potential distribution can be routinely measured in cavities of greater than 100 µm opening dimension, but the ability to measure the concentrations of chemical species and their change with time in the presence of potential gradients is only recently becoming possible. Microprobes for potential, pH, and chloride ion concentration will be described and results with these sensors will be presented and discussed for creviced iron samples in aqueous electrolytes. Results reveal that these species change in concentration and distribution with time, with the greatest ionic concentrations corresponding to locations of highest metal dissolution rate on the crevice wall. These new physical chemistry insights provide a better understanding of the passive-to-active behavior in crevices.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Conference-Paper
Communicated by:Gerhard Ertl
Affiliations:Fritz-Haber-Institut/Physical Chemistry
External Affiliations:Wolfe RC, Pickering HW, Penn State Univ, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, University Pk, PA 16802 USA
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