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          Institute: MPI für Astronomie     Collection: Publikationen_mpia     Display Documents



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ID: 225825.0, MPI für Astronomie / Publikationen_mpia
Observations and theoretical implications of
the large-separation lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112
Authors:Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Keeton, Charles R.; Pindor, Bartosz; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gregg, Michael D.; Becker, Robert H.; Chiu, Kuenley; Zheng, Wei; Ichikawa, Shin-Ichi; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Castander, Francisco J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Johnston, David E.; Kent, Stephen M.; Nichol, Robert C.; Richards, Gordon T.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schneider, Donald P.; Sheldon, Erin Scott; Szalay, Alexander S.
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2004
Title of Journal:The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:605
Start Page:78
End Page:97
Review Status:not specified
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:We study the recently discovered gravitational
lens SDSS J1004+4112, the first quasar lensed by
a cluster of galaxies. It consists of four images
with a maximum separation of 14.62". The system
was selected from the photometric data of the
Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and has been
confirmed as a lensed quasar at z=1.734 on the
basis of deep imaging and spectroscopic
follow-up observations. We present
color-magnitude relations for galaxies near the
lens plus spectroscopy of three central cluster
members, which unambiguously confirm that a
cluster at z=0.68 is responsible for the large
image separation. We find a wide range of lens
models consistent with the data, and despite
considerable diversity they suggest four general
conclusions: (1) the brightest cluster galaxy and
the center of the cluster potential well appear
to be offset by several kiloparsecs; (2) the
cluster mass distribution must be elongated in
the north-south direction, which is consistent
with the observed distribution of cluster
galaxies; (3) the inference of a large tidal
shear (~0.2) suggests significant substructure in
the cluster; and (4) enormous uncertainty in the
predicted time delays between the images means
that measuring the delays would greatly improve
constraints on the models. We also compute the
probability of such large-separation lensing in
the SDSS quasar sample on the basis of the cold
dark matter model. The lack of large-separation
lenses in previous surveys and the discovery of
one in SDSS together imply a mass fluctuation
normalization
‚‚sigma;8=1.0+0.4-0.2
(95% confidence) if cluster dark matter halos
have an inner density profile
‚‚rho;~r-1.5. Shallower profiles would
require higher values of ‚‚sigma;8.
Although the statistical conclusion might be
somewhat dependent on the degree of the
complexity of the lens potential, the discovery
of SDSS J1004+4112 is consistent with the
predictions of the abundance of cluster-scale
halos in the cold dark matter scenario.
Free Keywords:Cosmology: Observations; Cosmology: Theory;
; Cosmology: Dark Matter; Galaxies: Clusters:
; General; Cosmology: Gravitational Lensing;
; Galaxies: Quasars: General; Galaxies: Quasars:
; Individual: Alphanumeric: SDSS J100434.91+411242.8
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:N. N.
Affiliations:MPI für Astronomie
External Affiliations:Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.),
AB(Department of Physics, University of Tokyo,
Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.),
AC(Astronomy and Astrophysics Department,
University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue,
Chicago, IL 60637.), AD(Princeton University
Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544.),
AE(Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall,
Princeton, NJ 08544.), AF(Department of Physics,
University of California at Davis, 1 Shields
Avenue, Davis, CA 95616.; Institute of Geophysics
and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory, L-413, 7000 East Avenue,
Livermore, CA 94550.), AG(Department of Physics,
University of California at Davis, 1 Shields
Avenue, Davis, CA 95616.; Institute of Geophysics
and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory, L-413, 7000 East Avenue,
Livermore, CA 94550.), AH(Department of Physics
and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San
Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218.),
AI(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns
Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive,
Baltimore, MD 21218.), AJ(National Astronomical
Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo
181-8588, Japan.), AK(Department of Physics,
University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.), AL(Princeton University
Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544.),
AM(Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O.
Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510.), AN(Princeton
University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton,
NJ 08544.), AO(Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box
59, Sunspot, NM 88349.), AP(Institut d'Estudis
Espacials de Catalunya/CSIC, Gran Capita 2-4,
08034 Barcelona, Spain.), AQ(Steward Observatory,
University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue,
Tucson, AZ 85721.), AR(Astronomy and Astrophysics
Department, University of Chicago, 5640 South
Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637.; Fermi National
Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL
60510.), AS(Department of Physics and Astronomy,
Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive,
Baltimore, MD 21218.; Department of Astronomy,
University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku,
Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.; Institute for Cosmic Ray
Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa,
Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582, Japan.),
AT(Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall,
Princeton, NJ 08544.), AU(Astronomy and
Astrophysics Department, University of Chicago,
5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637.),
AV(Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O.
Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510.), AW(Department of
Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh,
PA 15213.), AX(Princeton University Observatory,
Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544.), AY(Max-Planck
Institute for Astronomy, K‚‚ouml;nigstuhl 17,
D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany.), AZ(Department of
Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State
University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University
Park, PA 16802.), BA(Astronomy and Astrophysics
Department, University of Chicago, 5640 South
Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637.; Center for
Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago,
5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637.),
BB(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns
Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive,
Baltimore, MD 21218.)
Identifiers:URL:http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-bib_query?bi... [ID No:1]
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