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          Institute: MPI für Informatik     Collection: Computer Graphics Group     Display Documents



ID: 428110.0, MPI für Informatik / Computer Graphics Group
Fluorescent Immersion Range Scanning
Authors:Hullin, Matthias B.; Fuchs, Martin; Ihrke, Ivo; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Lensch, Hendrik P. A.
Language:English
Publisher:ACM
Place of Publication:New York, NY
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2008
Title of Proceedings:Proceedings of ACM SIGGRAPH 2008
Start Page:Art.87.1
End Page:10
Title of Series:ACM Transactions on Graphics
Place of Conference/Meeting:Los Angeles, USA
(Start) Date of Conference/Meeting
 (YYYY-MM-DD):
2008-08-11
End Date of Conference/Meeting 
 (YYYY-MM-DD):
2008-08-15
Copyright:© ACM, 2008. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by
permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive
version was published in ACM Transactions on Graphics, Volume 27, Issue 3,
Article 87 (August 2008)
DOI 10.1145/1360612.1360686
Audience:Experts Only
Intended Educational Use:No
Abstract / Description:The quality of a 3D range scan should not depend on the surface properties of
the object. Most active range scanning techniques, however, assume a diffuse
reflector to allow for a robust detection of incident light patterns. In our
approach we embed the object into a fluorescent liquid. By analyzing the light
rays that become visible due to fluorescence rather than analyzing their
reflections off the surface, we can detect the intersection points between the
projected laser sheet and the object surface for a wide range of different
materials. For transparent objects we can even directly depict a slice through
the object in just one image by matching its refractive index to the one of the
embedding liquid. This enables a direct sampling of the object geometry without
the need for computational reconstruction. This way, a high-resolution 3D
volume can be assembled simply by sweeping a laser plane through the object. We
demonstrate the effectiveness of our light sheet range scanning approach on a
set of objects manufactured from a variety of materials and material mixes,
including dark, translucent and transparent objects.
Last Change of the Resource (YYYY-MM-DD):2009-03-25
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Conference-Paper
Communicated by:Hans-Peter Seidel
Affiliations:MPI f�r Informatik/Computer Graphics Group
Identifiers:LOCALID:C125756E0038A185-AEDE89BC0DB5AD63C12574D60029194E-...
URL:http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1360612.1360686
DOI:10.1145/1360612.1360686
ISSN:0730-0301
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