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          Institute: MPI für Psycholinguistik     Collection: Yearbook 2010     Display Documents



ID: 453274.0, MPI für Psycholinguistik / Yearbook 2010
No lexical–prelexical feedback during speech perception or: Is it time to stop playing those Christmas tapes?
Authors:McQueen, James M.; Jesse, Alexandra; Norris, Dennis
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2009
Title of Journal:Journal of Memory and Language
Volume:61
Start Page:1
End Page:18
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Experts Only
Intended Educational Use:No
Abstract / Description:The strongest support for feedback in speech perception comes from evidence of apparent lexical influence on prelexical fricative-stop compensation for coarticulation. Lexical knowledge (e.g., that the ambiguous final fricative of Christma? should be [s]) apparently influences perception of following stops. We argue that all such previous demonstrations can be explained without invoking lexical feedback. In particular, we show that one demonstration [Magnuson, J. S., McMurray, B., Tanenhaus, M. K., & Aslin, R. N. (2003). Lexical effects on compensation for coarticulation: The ghost of Christmash past. Cognitive Science, 27, 285–298] involved experimentally-induced biases (from 16 practice trials) rather than feedback. We found that the direction of the compensation effect depended on whether practice stimuli were words or nonwords. When both were used, there was no lexically-mediated compensation. Across experiments, however, there were lexical effects on fricative identification. This dissociation (lexical involvement in the fricative decisions but not in the following stop decisions made on the same trials) challenges interactive models in which feedback should cause both effects. We conclude that the prelexical level is sensitive to experimentally-induced phoneme-sequence biases, but that there is no feedback during
speech perception.
Free Keywords:Speech perception, Feedback, Interactive vs. autonomous models, Compensation for coarticulation
Last Change of the Resource (YYYY-MM-DD):2009-03-02
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:kastens
Affiliations:MPI für Psycholinguistik
Identifiers:LOCALID:escidoc:61278
DOI:10.1016/j.jml.2009.03.002
URL:http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/pubman/item/escidoc:6127...
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