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          Institute: MPI für molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik     Collection: Publikationen MPI-CBG 2010-arch     Display Documents



ID: 546573.0, MPI für molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik / Publikationen MPI-CBG 2010-arch
Gene expression divergence recapitulates the developmental hourglass model
Authors:Kalinka, Alex T.; Varga, Karolina M.; Gerrard, Dave T.; Preibisch, Stephan W.; Corcoran, David L.; Jarrels, Julia; Ohler, Uwe; Bergman, Casey M.; Tomancák, Pavel
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2010
Title of Journal:Nature
Volume:468
Issue / Number:7325
Start Page:811
End Page:814
Copyright:not available
Audience:Experts Only
Intended Educational Use:No
Abstract / Description:The observation that animal morphology tends to be conserved during the embryonic phylotypic period (a period of maximal similarity between the species within each animal phylum) led to the proposition that embryogenesis diverges more extensively early and late than in the middle, known as the hourglass model1, 2. This pattern of conservation is thought to reflect a major constraint on the evolution of animal body plans3. Despite a wealth of morphological data confirming that there is often remarkable divergence in the early and late embryos of species from the same phylum4, 5, 6, 7, it is not yet known to what extent gene expression evolution, which has a central role in the elaboration of different animal forms8, 9, underpins the morphological hourglass pattern. Here we address this question using species-specific microarrays designed from six sequenced Drosophila species separated by up to 40 million years. We quantify divergence at different times during embryogenesis, and show that expression is maximally conserved during the arthropod phylotypic period. By fitting different evolutionary models to each gene, we show that at each time point more than 80% of genes fit best to models incorporating stabilizing selection, and that for genes whose evolutionarily optimal expression level is the same across all species, selective constraint is maximized during the phylotypic period. The genes that conform most to the hourglass pattern are involved in key developmental processes. These results indicate that natural selection acts to conserve patterns of gene expression during mid-embryogenesis, and provide a genome-wide insight into the molecular basis of the hourglass pattern of developmental evolution.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:nn
Affiliations:MPI für molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik
Identifiers:LOCALID:4240
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