Home News About Us Contact Contributors Disclaimer Privacy Policy Help FAQ

Home
Search
Quick Search
Advanced
Fulltext
Browse
Collections
Persons
My eDoc
Session History
Login
Name:
Password:
Documentation
Help
Support Wiki
Direct access to
document ID:


          Institute: MPI für Psycholinguistik     Collection: Yearbook 2011     Display Documents



ID: 555092.0, MPI für Psycholinguistik / Yearbook 2011
Are positive vocalizations perceived as communicating happiness across cultural boundaries? [Article addendum]
Authors:Sauter, Disa
Language:English
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2010-11
Title of Journal:Communicative & Integrative Biology
Volume:3
Issue / Number:5
Start Page:440
End Page:442
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Not Specified
Intended Educational Use:No
Abstract / Description:Laughter communicates a feeling of enjoyment across cultures, while non-verbal vocalizations of several other positive emotions, such as achievement or sensual pleasure, are recognizable only within, but not across, cultural boundaries. Are these positive vocalizations nevertheless interpreted cross-culturally as signaling positive affect? In a match-to-sample task, positive emotional vocal stimuli were paired with positive and negative facial expressions, by English participants and members of the Himba, a semi-nomadic, culturally isolated Namibian group. The results showed that laughter was associated with a smiling facial expression across both groups, consistent with previous work showing that human laughter is a positive, social signal with deep evolutionary roots. However, non-verbal vocalizations of achievement, sensual pleasure, and relief were not cross-culturally associated with smiling facial expressions, perhaps indicating that these types of vocalizations are not cross-culturally interpreted as communicating a positive emotional state, or alternatively that these emotions are associated with positive facial expression other than smiling. These results are discussed in the context of positive emotional communication in vocal and facial signals. Research on the perception of non-verbal vocalizations of emotions across cultures demonstrates that some affective signals, including laughter, are associated with particular facial configurations and emotional states, supporting theories of emotions as a set of evolved functions that are shared by all humans regardless of cultural boundaries.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:Karin Kastens
Affiliations:MPI für Psycholinguistik
Identifiers:LOCALID:escidoc:468371
DOI:10.4161/cib.3.5.12209
URI:http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/cib/artic...
URL:http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/pubman/item/escidoc:4683...
The scope and number of records on eDoc is subject to the collection policies defined by each institute - see "info" button in the collection browse view.