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          Institute: MPI für Psycholinguistik     Collection: Yearbook 2011     Display Documents



  history
ID: 555223.0, MPI für Psycholinguistik / Yearbook 2011
Early use of phonetic information in spoken word recognition: Lexical stress drives eye movements immediately
Authors:Reinisch, Eva; Jesse, Alexandra; McQueen, James M.
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2010-03-17
Title of Journal:Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume:63
Issue / Number:4
Start Page:772
End Page:783
Review Status:Peer-review
Audience:Not Specified
Intended Educational Use:No
Abstract / Description:For optimal word recognition listeners should use all relevant acoustic information as soon as it comes available. Using printed-word eye-tracking we investigated when during word processing Dutch listeners use suprasegmental lexical stress information to recognize words. Fixations on targets such as 'OCtopus' (capitals indicate stress) were more frequent than fixations on segmentally overlapping but differently stressed competitors ('okTOber') before segmental information could disambiguate the words. Furthermore, prior to segmental disambiguation, initially stressed words were stronger lexical competitors than non-initially stressed words. Listeners recognize words by immediately using all relevant information in the speech signal.
Free Keywords:spoken word recognition, lexical stress, eye-tracking
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:Karin Kastens
Affiliations:MPI für Psycholinguistik
Identifiers:URL:http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/pubman/item/escidoc:6628...
DOI:10.1080/17470210903104412
LOCALID:escidoc:66282
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