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          Institute: MPI für Entwicklungsbiologie     Collection: Abteilung 6 - Molecular Biology (D. Weigel)     Display Documents



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ID: 706637.0, MPI für Entwicklungsbiologie / Abteilung 6 - Molecular Biology (D. Weigel)
Convergent targeting of a common host protein-network by pathogen effectors from three kingdoms of life
Authors:Weßling, R.; Epple, P.; Altmann, S.; He, Y.; Yang, L.; Henz, S. R.; McDonald, N.; Wiley, K.; Bader, K. C.; Glasser, C.; Mukhtar, M. S.; Haigis, S.; Ghamsari, L.; Stephens, A. E.; Ecker, J. R.; Vidal, M.; Jones, J. D.; Mayer, K. F.; Ver Loren van Themaat, E.; Weigel, D.; Schulze-Lefert, P.; Dangl, J. L.; Panstruga, R.; Braun, P.
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2014-09-10
Title of Journal:Cell Host & Microbe
Journal Abbrev.:Cell Host Microbe
Volume:16
Issue / Number:3
Start Page:364
End Page:375
Sequence Number of Article:25211078
Review Status:Internal review
Audience:Experts Only
Abstract / Description:While conceptual principles governing plant immunity are becoming clear, its systems-level organization and the evolutionary dynamic of the host-pathogen interface are still obscure. We generated a systematic protein-protein interaction network of virulence effectors from the ascomycete pathogen Golovinomyces orontii and Arabidopsis thaliana host proteins. We combined this data set with corresponding data for the eubacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. The resulting network identifies host proteins onto which intraspecies and interspecies pathogen effectors converge. Phenotyping of 124 Arabidopsis effector-interactor mutants revealed a correlation between intraspecies and interspecies convergence and several altered immune response phenotypes. Several effectors and the most heavily targeted host protein colocalized in subnuclear foci. Products of adaptively selected Arabidopsis genes are enriched for interactions with effector targets. Our data suggest the existence of a molecular host-pathogen interface that is conserved across Arabidopsis accessions, while evolutionary adaptation occurs in the immediate network neighborhood of effector targets.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Affiliations:MPI für Entwicklungsbiologie/Abteilung 6 - Molekulare Biologie (Detlef Weigel)
External Affiliations:Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM), Center for Life and Food Sciences Weihenstephan, Department for Plant Systems Biology, D-85354 Freising, Germany. Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany. Plant Genome and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Biology, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) and Department of Cancer Biology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Plant Biology Lab, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. The Sainsbury Laboratory, John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, Colney Lane, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Carolina Center for Genome Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: dangl@email.unc.edu. Department of Plant Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, D-50829, Germany; Rheinisch Westfalische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen University, Institute for Biology I, Unit of Plant Molecular Cell Biology, D-52074 Aachen, Germany. Electronic address: panstruga@bio1.rwth-aachen.de. Technische Universitat Munchen (TUM), Center for Life and Food Sciences Weihenstephan, Department for Plant Systems Biology, D-85354 Freising, Germany. Electronic address: pbraun@wzw.tum.de.
Identifiers:ISSN:1934-6069 (Electronic) 1931-3128 (Linking) %R 10.1... [ID No:1]
URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25211078 [ID No:2]
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