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          Institute: MPI für molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik     Collection: MPI-CBG Publications 2015 (arch)     Display Documents



ID: 718048.0, MPI für molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik / MPI-CBG Publications 2015 (arch)
Aged insulin granules display reduced microtubule-dependent mobility and are disposed within actin-positive multigranular bodies.
Authors:Hoboth, Peter; Müller, Andreas; Ivanova, Anna; Mziaut, Hassan; Dehghany, J; Sönmez, Anke; Lachnit, Martina; Meyer-Hermann, M; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Solimena, Michele
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2015
Title of Journal:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume:112
Issue / Number:7
Start Page:667
End Page:676
Copyright:not available
Audience:Experts Only
Intended Educational Use:No
Abstract / Description:Insulin secretion is key for glucose homeostasis. Insulin secretory granules (SGs) exist in different functional pools, with young SGs being more mobile and preferentially secreted. However, the principles governing the mobility of age-distinct SGs remain undefined. Using the time-reporter insulin-SNAP to track age-distinct SGs we now show that their dynamics can be classified into three components: highly dynamic, restricted, and nearly immobile. Young SGs display all three components, whereas old SGs are either restricted or nearly immobile. Both glucose stimulation and F-actin depolymerization recruit a fraction of nearly immobile young, but not old, SGs for highly dynamic, microtubule-dependent transport. Moreover, F-actin marks multigranular bodies/lysosomes containing aged SGs. These data demonstrate that SGs lose their responsiveness to glucose stimulation and competence for microtubule-mediated transport over time while changing their relationship with F-actin.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Communicated by:Thüm
Affiliations:MPI für molekulare Zellbiologie und Genetik
Identifiers:LOCALID:6137
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