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          Institute: MPI für Herz- und Lungenforschung (W. G. Kerckhoff Institut)     Collection: Yearbook 2016     Display Documents



  history
ID: 724014.0, MPI für Herz- und Lungenforschung (W. G. Kerckhoff Institut) / Yearbook 2016
Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma
Authors:Banat, G. A.; Tretyn, A.; Pullamsetti, S. S.; Wilhelm, J.; Weigert, A.; Olesch, C.; Ebel, K.; Stiewe, T.; Grimminger, F.; Seeger, W.; Fink, L.; Savai, R.
Date of Publication (YYYY-MM-DD):2015
Title of Journal:PLoS ONE
Volume:10
Issue / Number:9
Start Page:e0139073
Audience:Not Specified
Abstract / Description:Recent studies indicate that the abnormal microenvironment of tumors may play a critical role in carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic characteristics potential. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung cancer tissue arrays containing normal and lung cancer sections was performed. This analysis was combined with cyto-/histomorphological assessment and quantification of cells to classify/subclassify tumors accurately and to perform a high throughput analysis of stromal cell composition in different types of lung cancer. In human lung cancer sections we observed a significant elevation/infiltration of total-T lymphocytes (CD3+), cytotoxic-T cells (CD8+), T-helper cells (CD4+), B cells (CD20+), macrophages (CD68+), mast cells (CD117+), mononuclear cells (CD11c+), plasma cells, activated-T cells (MUM1+), B cells, myeloid cells (PD1+) and neutrophilic granulocytes (myeloperoxidase+) compared with healthy donor specimens. We observed all of these immune cell markers in different types of lung cancers including squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, adenosquamous cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, papillary adenocarcinoma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. The numbers of all tumor-associated immune cells (except MUM1+ cells) in stage III cancer specimens was significantly greater than those in stage I samples. We observed substantial stage-dependent immune cell infiltration in human lung tumors suggesting that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role during lung carcinogenesis. Strategies for therapeutic interference with lung cancer microenvironment should consider the complexity of its immune cell composition.
External Publication Status:published
Document Type:Article
Version Comment:Automatic journal name synchronization
Communicated by:n.n.
Affiliations:MPI für physiologische und klinische Forschung
External Affiliations:Department of Lung Development and Remodeling, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Bad Nauheim, Germany. Internal Medicine, University of Giessen and Marburg Lung Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Giessen, Germany; Department of Lung Development and Remodeling, Max-Planck-Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Bad Nauheim, Germany. Institute of Biochemistry I, Goethe-University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany. Molecular Oncology, Philipps-University, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Marburg, Germany. Institute of Pathology and Cytology, UEGP, Wetzlar, Germany.
Identifiers:ISSN:1932-6203 (Electronic) 1932-6203 (Linking) %R 10.1371/journal.pone.0139073
URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26413839
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